As a landlord, routine property inspections provide valuable insight regarding the maintenance of your property. Continue reading to learn more about the basics of property inspections and how they affect you as a landlord.  Does your property need some upgrades?  Adkins Building and Construction can help!

What is a property inspection?
A property inspection is a comprehensive evaluation of your property. Inspectors will thoroughly evaluate the cleanliness and condition of various rooms on your property, including the:

  • Lounge room
  • Bedrooms
  • Kitchen
  • Front/backyards
  • Garage

Each area will be examined, and notes will be taken about each one’s condition. The following fixtures will be evaluated:

  • Walls
  • Ceilings
  • Light fittings
  • Curtains
  • Windows
  • Smoke/CO2 alarms
  • Appliances

You will receive a written report that delineates any damage, wear, or repairs made to any part of your property. Your comprehensive report can include photos, but pictures cannot be taken of the client’s personal belongings or without their consent. Your report will also include recommendations on how to improve, repair, or maintain your property based on the reported information.

Who conducts inspections?
Property inspections are most often handled by a property management company or real estate team.

How often will property inspections take place?
Property inspections will occur regularly, usually every three months. More thorough inspections will take place at the beginning and closing of a tenancy contract.

What happens when a tenant moves in? Vacates the property?
In-depth evaluations will take place before a tenant moves in and after they vacate the premises. In inspections before the tenancy, detailed notes will be made about room/appliance condition and will be referred to as a measure of the tenant’s maintenance quality.

When a tenant ends their contract, the property management company handling inspections will communicate detailed expectations to the tenant. Once the tenant leaves, the inspector will examine the property and compare the results to the original report made before the tenant moved in. By law, they are required to account for reasonable wear and tear on your property to be fair to the ex-tenant and the landlord.